My 5 year old grandson suffers from severe food allergies. Is there anything you could do to help him?

Yes!! We offer a therapy called Neurological Stress Reduction Therapy. We use state of the art computerized technology to measure a person’s stress response to common everyday substances.  (There are no needles involved!). Then, using principles of Traditional Acupuncture, we shine a cold laser on specific points on the body to recondition the Nervous System to not react to those substances again! Unlike traditional allergy treatments, you do not have to avoid these substances in the future. The treatments are designed to reduce stress in the Nervous System, so that it will not overreact to future exposure to these substances. Kayla W.: “ My son used to have food allergies. He would have problems with dairy and yeast products.He used to have stomach aches and break out really bad when having foods that he could not have for 6 years. He couldn’t eat food like most of the kids in his class. Now that he had the treatments with Dr. Gibson, he can have
any dairy products or yeast products. We highly recommend The Gibson Center. We see a big difference in him! He is feeling so much better, even some of the family see a difference in him. Thanks again to The Gibson Center. They helped my son a lot!” Kim M: “Prior to treatments with Dr. Gibson, my son had extreme allergies- sneezing, stuffy nose and eczema on his face. He would have flare ups whenever he played outside, or was around cut grass, which was often, since he loves the outdoors. He would take allergy medicine which would make him sleepy and affect his schoolwork. He would also have digestive issues and say his stomach hurt whenever he ate. After his treatments, he has had no allergy problems – even when around hay and grass. He also said his stomach doesn’t hurt him when he eats anymore. He doesn’t take allergy medicine any longer, and he can eat anything he wants!! I would absolutely recommend this treatment to anyone
with seasonal allergies or with stomach problems.” I would love to help your grandson!! Call our office 479- 587-0227 to schedule a consultation so that I can show you how this therapy works.

Young Children Pay a High Price for Screen Time

Many parents are occasionally thankful for the television—after all, it can serve as a low-cost, short-term babysitter while they cook or do housework. At the same time, however, many parents are concerned about the amount of television that their children watch—and for good reason. Statistics tell us that in America, children under six watch an average of two hours of TV a day, and children eight to 18 spend an average of four hours in front of a TV and often an additional two hours a day on computers or playing video games.

So what does all of this screen time mean for America’s children? Recent research published in JAMA Pediatrics suggests that it is results in poorer well-being and sleep and that it contributes to childhood obesity.

In the first study, part of a larger research project called IDEFICS (Identification and Prevention of Dietary- and Lifestyle-Induced Health Effects in Children and Infants), researchers examined 3,604 children aged two to six to determine if there was a relationship between their electronic media use and their sense of well-being. They assessed the children based on six standardized indicators of well-being (including emotional problems, peer problems, self-esteem, family functioning, and social interactions) and compared the results to the number of hours they spent in front of a TV, computer, or video game screen. They found that increased media use predicted much poorer senses of well-being. TV was found to be more harmful than computer use, but overall they found that there was a 1.2- to 2.0-fold increase in emotional problems and poorer family functioning for each additional hour of media use.

A second JAMA Pediatrics study involving 1,713 Spanish children found that children who watched more than 1.5 hours of television per day had shorter sleep duration and began to suffer from sleep deprivation. Their sleep duration shortened with every extra hour of television watched over the 1.5-hour baseline. And in a third study, researchers found that increased media exposure resulted in sharply increasing BMI (Body Mass Index) scores, and thus a tendency toward childhood obesity.

So how much TV is too much? Every day more research comes out indicating that exposure to electronic media can have adverse effects on children—effects that can persist into adulthood.

As a result, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that children under the age of two not watch any TV, as the first two years of life are a critical time for brain development. Television and other electronic media can prevent exploring, playing, and interacting with parents and others, all of which are critical for social development. In addition, the AAP suggests that children older than two watch no more than one to two hours of electronic media per day.

Your Teenager and Back Pain: Why Manual Therapies Are the Best Option

Low back pain is a condition that affects more than 600 million people worldwide, including over a third of all Americans. This number exceeds the number of people affected by diabetes, heart disease, and cancer combined. The financial burden (medical care plus lost productivity) caused by chronic lower back pain in America exceeds $550 billion annually.

That said, one of the saddest aspects of chronic lower back pain is that it doesn’t only affect adults. It also affects children and people in their teens and early twenties. And a number of studies have indicated that lower back pain in adolescents is strongly associated with the development of chronic lower back pain later in life. The good news, however, is that those adolescents who have been successfully treated to eliminate lower back pain in their youth have a lower risk of developing chronic lower back pain as they grow older.

So it’s natural that the medical community is interested in which treatments can be considered “successful” in terms of eliminating the lower back pain itself, and helping to prevent it from reoccurring. This interest led to a recent study. The aim of the study was to determine which of the commonly-available treatment methodologies were most effective. To determine this, researchers performed a meta-analysis of existing studies published in English, French, Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese to measure which of the treatments used in these studies were most effective in producing positive outcomes in terms of pain, disability, flexibility, endurance, and mental health. The researchers found studies that produced data for 11 treatment groups and 5 control groups involving a total of 334 children and adolescents, and then compared the data.

Their findings were both strong and definitive. Of all the treatment methodologies used in the individual studies, the ones most effective in producing short-term and long-term positive outcomes in the five areas studied were those that involved therapeutic physical conditioning and manual therapy. That is, treatments provided by “hands on” practitioners such as chiropractors, osteopaths, and physical therapists.

These therapies, commonly involving joint and spinal manipulation and ultrasound treatment to reduce pain, were subjectively found to be more effective by the patients than other treatments. The patients’ subjective analysis was confirmed in most of the studies by clinician assessments. Naturally, these “manual therapy” treatment options were preferable in many other ways as well, because they avoided reliance on potentially addictive painkillers like OxyContin and Vicodin, epidural steroid injections, and surgery.

These findings confirm what Doctors of Chiropractic have observed in their own clinics. Over the years, we have seen many patients (of all ages) benefit from the manual therapies we use to provide relief for their lower back pain. So if you (or your children) experience lower back pain—whether occasional or chronic—contact your chiropractor and ask him or her to explain to you the treatment options available, and what they can do to relieve your symptoms and allow you to enjoy life free from pain once again.

Youth Concussions in the Spotlight

 

A concussion is essentially an injury to the tissues or blood vessels in the brain. It can occur when the soft tissues are pressed against the bone of the skull, resulting from an impact or blow to the head experienced during a fall or from sports injury. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines a concussion as “a type of traumatic brain injury, or TBI, caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head that can change the way your brain normally works.” In addition, the CDC notes that “Concussions can also occur from a blow to the body that causes the head to move rapidly back and forth. Even a ‘ding,’ ‘getting your bell rung,’ or what seems to be mild bump or blow to the head can be serious.”

Shining a Spotlight on Youth Concussions

Over the past few years, there have been a variety of efforts to educate the public about the dangers of childhood concussions. In particular, a great deal of focus has been placed on preventing “second impact syndrome” and managing the recovery of young athletes. For example:

In 2007, the Pennsylvania Department of Education, the Brain Injury Association of Pennsylvania, and the Pennsylvania Department of Health joined together to create the BrainSTEPS program—a “Return to School Protocol” designed to help shorten the duration of concussion symptoms by eliminating all activity that might worsen the child’s condition. This includes ceasing all physical activities during recess, all sports, physical education classes, and similar activities.

In 2009, Washington State become the first state in the U.S. to enact a comprehensive youth sports concussion safety law (called the Zackery Lystedt Law). By early 2014, 47 other states and the District of Columbia had followed Washington’s lead.

In 2014, the NCAA and the U.S. Department of Defense funded the largest study of sports-related concussions in history to further our scientific understanding. Researchers from 21 schools will “eventually gather data from 35,000 athletes and military academy cadets across all sports at 30 campuses…”

Concussion Symptoms: What Parents Should Know

Mild concussions in childhood are fairly common and are not usually a cause for serious concern. However, childhood concussions should never be taken lightly and it’s important to know what symptoms to look for. These symptoms can vary depending on the severity of the injury and the individual themselves, and some are so mild that they may be difficult to notice. Sometimes they go away quickly, sometimes they return and sometimes their appearance is delayed for days or even weeks. Other times, they linger for years or even get worse.

  • Dizziness
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Seizures
  • Mild to moderate headache
  • Mood changes, such as unusual irritability or loss of interest in favorite activities
  • Difficulty focusing or remembering things
  • Drowsiness and reduced energy

Ask your child if they have any of the symptoms, and make sure to observe them closely for a few weeks. Your child is at increased risk if they have experienced previous head injury, are taking a blood thinning medicine, suffer bleeding disorders, are under one year old, have other neurological problems, have difficulty walking or are active in high contact sports.

If your child is harder to wake up than normal, shows worsened symptoms, won’t stop crying, doesn’t eat well, has worsening headaches or symptoms that have lasted longer than six weeks, then contact your doctor or caregiver. If your child shows a change in personality, bleeds out of the ears or nose, has trouble recognizing people, or vomits repeatedly, go to the emergency room. Dial 911 in the event of seizures, unequal pupil size and longer-term unconsciousness.

Irrespective of advice you get on the Internet or by phone, if you have any doubt in your mind about your child’s health after a head injury, seek the help of a professional. You know your child best!

Want Your Kids to Be Active? Here Is Why YOU Should Be their Lifestyle Role Model

It’s not news—obesity is a growing national epidemic among young people. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that obesity in children has doubled in the last 30 years and quadrupled in adolescents. Nearly 20% of children 6-11 years old are obese as are almost 23% of teenagers. This places them at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease, diabetes, bone and joint problems, sleep apnea, type 2 diabetes, stroke, several types of cancer, and osteoarthritis. Finally—and even more concerning—studies have shown that people who are obese as children tend to be obese as adults.

What’s happening here?  In large part, it comes down to our lifestyle choices. Record numbers of both adults and children are succumbing to the temptations of TV, computers, and video games, and many of us simply don’t get the exercise our bodies need to stay healthy.

Naturally, parents who read statistics like these may be—and should be—concerned about their kids. More and more often, they ask themselves questions like “What can we do to help our kids be more active and physically fit?” One answer to this question is pretty simple: To get your kids to be more active, engage in more active pursuits with them. One of the keys to getting children to exercise more is to have them see their parents exercise more. That’s the finding from a new study published in the journal Pediatrics

In the study, researchers at the University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine in England fitted 554 mother-child pairs with equipment to measure how much exercise they were getting when they were together as well as when they were apart. Accelerometers tracked their exercise levels, and GPS devices measured how close they were to each other. Over the course of seven days, the findings were clear – the more physical activity the mother was engaged in while with the child, the more active the child was during the rest of the day. In fact, for every minute of moderate-to-vigorous activity the mother got, the child was likely to get ten percent more of the same activity. Conversely, for every minute the mother was sedentary, the child was 0.18 minutes more sedentary. Both of these effects were more pronounced in girls than in boys.

These findings seem to indicate that parents can be effective role models for their children by getting more active exercise themselves. But specialists emphasize that parents don’t have to drop their other priorities to do this. Physical therapist Teresa Beckman suggests, “Incorporate small changes into your daily life. For example, rather than playing a board game together, go outside and play hopscotch. Or if you’re planning a trip to your local playground, try walking instead of driving.”

Other suggestions for becoming more active with your children include playing more sports with them, walking more with them (if you take the bus, get off one or two stops early and walk the rest of the way), riding bikes together, and even playing Frisbee. Dancing is good exercise, so you can encourage your kids to take lessons in various forms of dance and then set a good example for them by attending the classes yourself. You can join exercise classes together, schedule regular pre-dinner walks or runs, or just play family games of basketball or soccer.

You are your child’s most important role model when it comes to teaching them about the importance of exercise. And exercising together is just as good for you as it is for them. So switch off that TV or computer and go out to play! You’ll both be doing something good for your health and having fun at the same time!

 

Young Children Pay a High Price for Screen Time

Many parents are occasionally thankful for the television—after all, it can serve as a low-cost, short-term babysitter while they cook or do housework. At the same time, however, many parents are concerned about the amount of television that their children watch—and for good reason. Statistics tell us that in America, children under six watch an average of two hours of TV a day, and children eight to 18 spend an average of four hours in front of a TV and often an additional two hours a day on computers or playing video games.

So what does all of this screen time mean for America’s children? Recent research published in JAMA Pediatrics suggests that it is results in poorer well-being and sleep and that it contributes to childhood obesity.

In the first study, part of a larger research project called IDEFICS (Identification and Prevention of Dietary- and Lifestyle-Induced Health Effects in Children and Infants), researchers examined 3,604 children aged two to six to determine if there was a relationship between their electronic media use and their sense of well-being. They assessed the children based on six standardized indicators of well-being (including emotional problems, peer problems, self-esteem, family functioning, and social interactions) and compared the results to the number of hours they spent in front of a TV, computer, or video game screen. They found that increased media use predicted much poorer senses of well-being. TV was found to be more harmful than computer use, but overall they found that there was a 1.2- to 2.0-fold increase in emotional problems and poorer family functioning for each additional hour of media use.

A second JAMA Pediatrics study involving 1,713 Spanish children found that children who watched more than 1.5 hours of television per day had shorter sleep duration and began to suffer from sleep deprivation. Their sleep duration shortened with every extra hour of television watched over the 1.5-hour baseline. And in a third study, researchers found that increased media exposure resulted in sharply increasing BMI (Body Mass Index) scores, and thus a tendency toward childhood obesity.

So how much TV is too much? Every day more research comes out indicating that exposure to electronic media can have adverse effects on children—effects that can persist into adulthood.

As a result, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that children under the age of two not watch any TV, as the first two years of life are a critical time for brain development. Television and other electronic media can prevent exploring, playing, and interacting with parents and others, all of which are critical for social development. In addition, the AAP suggests that children older than two watch no more than one to two hours of electronic media per day.

How to Get Your Kids Up and Moving

About one third of children in the United States are overweight. This is a worrying statistic, but not necessarily a surprising one. Busy school and family schedules leave kids little time for physical activity, while computers and television are often a much more appealing way to spend time than running around outside.

However, if you watch kids on a playground, you’ll notice something interesting: when it comes to running, jumping, and playing, kids are a natural. Most kids want to get moving: all they need is the right environment and a little encouragement. Here’s how you can help.

Encouraging Kids to Be More Active

Kids need at least an hour of physical activity every day to stay healthy. You can help them achieve this amount of activity by providing opportunities to play and monitoring the amount of time they spend on sedentary activities. Use your knowledge of your child’s likes and dislikes to choose activities to direct them towards. Some kids will thrive on a soccer team or in a martial arts class, while others are miserable in these more structured environments. Never force a child to participate in a physical activity he or she don’t enjoy. Instead, work with them to find appealing ways to play.

Similarly, encouraging kids to stay active is much more effective when things are kept simple. If your kids are not naturally drawn to competition, keep the focus off winning and instead encourage them to just have a good time. Try to focus on age-appropriate activities and stifle the urge to push your kids towards better performance. Running, playing, and having a great time is enough.

Your children look to you to learn what kinds of habits constitute a healthy lifestyle. If you tend towards more sedentary pursuits yourself, your kids will likely mimic you. The opposite is also true: if you show them that you find physical activities fun, they’ll want to give them a try too. Make exercise a family activity. Go on walks or bike rides together, spend an afternoon hiking on some easy mountain trails, or take a trip to a skating rink. Engaging in physical activity together will help bring you closer and start building habits that your child can come back to throughout their lifetime.

Finally, do your best to limit the amount of screen time your children indulge in. A sedentary lifestyle is one of the leading causes of obesity, so monitor and control how much time kids spend on the couch. An hour a day is a good rule of thumb, but again, use your knowledge of your child to determine which amount of time is most appropriate.

Encouraging kids to be more active is an important part of keeping them healthy. For more guidance on how to maintain your children’s health, consider consulting with a chiropractor. Chiropractic care focuses on the whole body, making your chiropractor a great resource for more information on keeping your kids (and yourself) active.

With some time and a little encouragement, even the most TV-loving kids can learn how to get up and have a great time. Get out there with them and get in on the active fun.

Is That Backpack Hurting Your Child’s Health?

On 8/01/2017 | By Chiro One Wellness Centers

September—the real most wonderful time of the year, right? Parents, you know what we’re talking about. Class is almost in session and it’s time for your beautiful babies to get up out of your house. But first, you’ve got to get all those school supplies in order, starting with the backpack. The kids may already have the coolest styles and colors and patterns in mind, but there’s only one thing you’ve got to keep your eye on—health!

Is That Backpack Hurting Your Child’s Health?

Backpacks worn improperly can be very damaging to your kid’s spinal health. In fact, it’s estimated that 79 million kids are suffering from backpack damage each year. Hauling around a heavy backpack everyday (especially over only one shoulder!) can contribute to serious postural imbalances, triggering subluxations, which are misalignments in the vertebrae of the spine. These misaligned vertebrae put pressure on the nervous system by irritating nearby nerves and blocking lines of communication within the body. This can lead to a whole different mess of symptoms, especially when left unaddressed.

Preventing Backpack Injury

So, how can you set your child up for success? Here’s a helpful list of ways you can help your child avoid backpack injury and strain!

Choose the right pack! If it’s too big, it’s no good. Always go for a sturdy backpack with two straps, and make sure it doesn’t hang more than four inches below the waistline. If your school is cool with it, it’s best to choose a backpack on wheels.

Pack smart! Your kid’s backpack shouldn’t be more than 15% of his or her body weight. If the pack forces the wearer to bend forward, that’s a sign of overloading. Pack only the necessities, and place the heavier items closer to the back.

Lift like a champ! Just grabbing the backpack and throwing it over your shoulder isn’t going to work. That’s just asking for some strain and pain. Here’s how to do it right:

  1. Face the backpack before you lift it
  2. Bend at the knees
  3. Using both hands, check the weight of the pack
  4. Lift with your legs, not your back
  5. Carefully put one shoulder strap on at a time, never sling the pack onto one shoulder

Wear it right! First rule: snug but not too tight. Both shoulder straps (as well as the waist strap if the backpack has one) should be used at all times—none of this “cool” slung-over-one-shoulder business. Encourage your kid to make frequent trips to their locker between classes to replace books.

Get adjusted! Proper backpack selection and wear aren’t the golden ticket to your child’s spinal health. Backpack injury or not, regular chiropractic adjustments are a gentle, natural way of reducing subluxations and pressure, restoring normal bodily communication. It’s the best way you could help your child maintain optimal health and wellness.

Scoliosis in Children and Adolescents

From time to time, children and adolescents are told to “stand up straight”.  Sometimes, the child just needs to practice proper posture. However, a change in stance, uneven shoulder height or a perceived inability to maintain a level hemline of the skirt of an adolescent girl may indicate a true spine deformity.

Scoliosis, or a sideways curve of the spine, is a condition that occurs in otherwise healthy children and adolescents, often with few if any symptoms. Some degree of scoliosis is relatively common. Very small curves may be detected in as many as two to three out of 100 people.

In younger children, the curve may be quite small, so you may not notice it. However, as the child grows, the curvature can become more severe. Because of this, most curves become more obvious during the adolescent growth spurt.  Small curves occur with similar frequency in boys and girls, but girls are more likely to progress to the point of requiring treatment.

The underlying cause of scoliosis may sometimes be related to a defect in bone development or other conditions such as cerebral palsy or muscular dystrophy. However, the vast majority of cases are seen in healthy, active adolescents. Scoliosis can run in families, but the exact cause of most cases is not known.

Scoliosis does not usually cause any pain, so if you are concerned about a curve in your child’s spine, talk to your child’s primary care physician.